Taiken Japan

Autumn Leaves 2016

One of the most popular dishes among Japanese business people – Ramen as a finishing dish.

One of the most popular dishes among Japanese business people – Ramen as a finishing dish.

Many of business enterprises throughout Japan often hold “Nomi-kai (drinking party)” where co-workers gather to have dinner and drinks after business hours, in order to streamline the communication among employees. We will be introducing the details on “nomi-kai” that are unique among Japanese business people in another opportunity, but today we would like to introduce “shime-no ramen (ramen as a finishing dish)”, after the business-related “nomi-kai”.

“Shime” refers to the refreshment at the end of dinner, and ocha-zuke or desserts in addition to ramen are served as finishing dishes. Many choose the “finishing menu” based on their health condition and the schedule for the following day.

For example, if the following day was a holiday with a date with the loved one is planned, you may want to reconsider eating “shime-no ramen” in order to avoid bad breath originating from the garlic and fat contained in ramen.

However, let’s not to forget that there are those “business persons who love ramens to death” who eat ramen no matter what. These people cannot end the day unless they get to eat “shime-no ramen” after their drinks.

And.. what if one of your clients is one of those die-hard ramen enthusiasts, and if you were invited to join him/her for the “shime-no ramen” after the drinks, and what if you weren’t feeling up for it? If you had decline the invite, then you may suffer the consequence of displeasing him/her. Let us show you one shop that may help you get through such a situation:

The shop is “Men-no-bo Toride” in Shibuya. The ramen here is served with lighter tonkotsu broth. Since they use thinner noodles, it is easier to eat, and features the right volume, and you should be able to finish eating the entire bowl even after your having too much to eat and drink. Another reason we are introducing this shop is that it is situated in the area which requires quite a walk from the station. If you suggest “Well, then how about a nice bowl of “shime-no ramen at Toride?” to your client, the client may say “Well, it’s kind of far, so why don’t we all call it a night then”.

Anyhow, if you really want to learn how Japanese business people think, you may want to join them for a nice bowl of “shime-no ramen” to deepen the interaction with them.